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Claudio

Much Ado About Nothing

Appearance and Deception

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A recurring theme in many of Shakespeare’s plays, and central to Much Ado About Nothing, explores how easily people are deceived not just by the false testimony of others but even by their own senses. Claudio, believing he was deceived by Don John, learned to place no trust in the words of others. With “Let every eye negotiate for itself,”
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Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?

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Lucio
Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this
restraint?
Claudio
From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty.
As surfeit is the father of much fast,Simile
So every scope by the immoderate use
Turns to restraint. Our natures do pursue,
Like rats that raven down their proper bane,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 120

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,

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,

And the new deputy now for the Duke—

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And the new deputy now for the Duke—
Whether it be the fault and glimpse of newness,
Or whether that the body public be
A horse whereon the governor doth ride,
Who, newly in the seat, that it may know
He can command, lets it straight feel the spur;
Whether the tyranny be in his place,
Or in his eminence that fills it up,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 154

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I prithee, Lucio, do me this kind service

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I prithee, Lucio, do me this kind service:
This day my sister should the cloister enter,
And there receive her approbation.
Acquaint her with the danger of my state;
Implore her, in my voice, that she make friends
To the strict deputy; bid herself assay him.
I have great hope in that; for in her youth
There is a prone and speechless dialect,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 173

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Friendship is constant in all other things

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Friendship is constant in all other things
Save in the office and affairs of love.Hendiadys
Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues.Synecdoche
Let every eye negotiate for itself,Synecdoche
And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch
Against whose charms faith melteth into bloodMetaphor
.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 173

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, ,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Appearance and Deception

Silence is the perfectest heralt of joy

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Silence is the perfectest heralt of joy; I were but little happy, if I could say how much!
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 300

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,

Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.

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Time goes on crutches till love have all his ritesPersonification.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 348

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,

Figures of Speech:

Be absolute for death

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Vincentio, the Duke
Be absolute for death: either death or life
Shall thereby be the sweeter. Reason thus with life:
If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing
That none but fools would keep. A breath thou art,
Servile to all the skyey influences,
That dost this habitation where thou keep’st
Hourly afflict. Merely,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 5

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Spoken by:
,

The sense of death is most in apprehension

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Isabella
The sense of death is most in apprehension,
And the poor beetle that we tread upon
In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
As when a giant dies.
Claudio
Why give you me this shame?
Think you I can a resolution fetch
From flow’ry tenderness? If I must die,
I will encounter darkness as a bride,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 85

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,

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where

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Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot;
This sensible warm motion to become
A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit
To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice;
To be imprison’d in the viewless winds
And blown with restless violence round about
The pendant world;
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 133

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O, what men dare do!

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O, what men dare do! What men may do! What men daily do, not knowing what they do!
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 19

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