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Claudio

Much Ado About Nothing

Appearance and Deception

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A recurring theme in many of Shakespeare’s plays, and central to Much Ado About Nothing, explores how easily people are deceived not just by the false testimony of others but even by their own senses. Claudio, believing he was deceived by Don John, learned to place no trust in the words of others. With “Let every eye negotiate for itself,”
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Benedick, didst thou note the daughter of Signior Leonato?

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Claudio
Benedick, didst thou note the daughter of
Signior Leonato?
Benedick
I noted her not, but I looked on her.
Claudio
Is she not a modest young lady?

Why, i’ faith, methinks she’s too low for a
high praise, too brown for a fair praise, and too
little for a great praise

Benedick
Do you question me as an honest man
should do,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 158

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Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?

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Lucio
Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?
Claudio
From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty.Diacope
As surfeit is the father of much fast,Simile & Alliteration
So every scope by the immoderate use
Turns to restraint.Irony
Our natures do pursue,
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Friendship is constant in all other things

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Friendship is constant in all other things
Save in the office and affairs of love.Hendiadys
Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues.Synecdoche
Let every eye negotiate for itself,Synecdoche
And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch
Against whose charms faith melteth into bloodMetaphor
.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 173

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Connected Notes:
Appearance and Deception

I have brought Count Claudio

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Beatrice
I have brought Count Claudio, whom you sent me to seek.
Prince
Why, how now, count, wherefore are you sad?
Claudio
Not sad, my lord.
Prince
How then, sick?

No, sure, my lord, my mother cried, but then there
was a star danced, and under that was I born.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 281

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Silence is the perfectest heralt of joy

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Silence is the perfectest heralt of joy; I were but little happy, if I could say how much!
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 300

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,

Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.

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Time goes on crutches till love have all his ritesPersonification.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 348

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So then you hope of pardon from Lord Angelo?

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Duke, as Friar
So then you hope of pardon from Lord Angelo?
Claudio
The miserable have no other medicine
But only hope.
I have hope to live and am prepared to die.Antithesis

To sue to live, I find I seek to die,
And seeking death,
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Now, sister, what’s the comfort?

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Claudio
Now, sister, what’s the comfort?
Isabella
Why,
As all comforts are, most good, most good indeed.Epizeuxis
Lord Angelo, having affairs to heaven,
Intends you for his swift ambassador,
Where you shall be an everlasting leiger;Metaphor

Therefore your best appointment make with speed.
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O, what men dare do!

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O, what men dare do! What men may do! What men daily do, not knowing what they do!
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 19

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O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been

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O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been
If half thy outward graces had been placed
About thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart!
But fare thee well, most foul, most fair. Farewell,
Thou pure impiety and impious purity.
For thee I’ll lock up all the gates of love
And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang,
To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 105

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