quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Characters » Chorus

Chorus

Henry V, Romeo and Juliet

Richard, Romeo, Juliet and the Sonnet

Read the Note

Two of Shakespeare’s earliest playsRichard III and Romeo and Juliet, open with sonnets and then employ variations on the sonnet’s structure for dramatic and poetic effect, which is not surprising. At this point in Shakespeare’s life he seems to have had dual career goals. First, he wanted to make money, which he could accomplish through theatre.
… continue reading this note

O, for a muse of fire

Read the Quote

O, for a muse of fire that would ascend
The brightest heaven of invention!Metaphor

A kingdom for a stage, princes to act,
And monarchs to behold the swelling scene!Anapodoton

Can this cockpit hold
The vasty fields of France? Or may we cram
Within this wooden O the very casques
That did affright the air at Agincourt?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene Prologue
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Two households, both alike in dignity

Read the Sonnet

Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudgeParenthesis
break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.Antanaclesis & Synecdoche
From forth the fatal loins of these two foesAlliteration, Oxymoron & Synecdoche
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life;
… continue reading this quote

Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie

Read the Sonnet

Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie,
And young affection gapes to be his heir;
That fair for which love groan’d for and would die,
With tender Juliet match’d, is now not fair.
Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,
Alike bewitchèd by the charm of looks,
But to his foe supposed he must complain,
And she steal love’s sweet bait from fearful hooks.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene Prologue
Line 1

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:

Themes:

Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet

Now all the youth of England are on fire

Read the Quote

Now all the youth of England are on fire,
And silken dalliance in the wardrobe lies;
Now thrive the armorers, and honor’s thought
Reigns solely in the breast of every man.
They sell the pasture now to buy the horse,
Following the mirror of all Christian kings
With wingèd heels, as English Mercurys.

They sell the pasture now to buy the horse,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line Chorus

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Come, now a roundel and a fairy song

Read the Quote

Titania
Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
Then, for the third part of a minute, hence—
Some to kill cankers in the muskrose buds,
Some war with reremice for their leathern wings
To make my small elves coats, and some keep back
The clamorous owl that nightly hoots and wonders
At our quaint spirits.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 1

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
,

Thus with imagined wing our swift scene flies

Read the Quote

Thus with imagined wing our swift scene flies
In motion of no less celerity
Than that of thought. Suppose that you have seen
The well-appointed king at Dover pier
Embark his royalty, and his brave fleet
With silken streamers the young Phoebus fanning.
Play with your fancies and in them behold,
Upon the hempen tackle, shipboys climbing.

In motion of no less celerity
Than that of thought.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line Chorus

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Now entertain conjecture of a time

Read the Quote

Now entertain conjecture of a time
When creeping murmur and the poring dark
Fills the wide vessel of the universe.

From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night,
The hum of either army stilly sounds,
That the fixed sentinels almost receive
The secret whispers of each other’s watch.

From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line Chorus

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Vouchsafe to those that have not read the story

Read the Quote

Chorus
Vouchsafe to those that have not read the story
That I may prompt them; and of such as have,
I humbly pray them to admit th’ excuse
Of time, of numbers, and due course of things,
Which cannot in their huge and proper life
Be here presented.

Behold, the English beach
Pales in the flood with men,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line Chorus

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Thus far with rough and all-unable pen

Read the Quote

Thus far with rough and all-unable pen
Our bending author hath pursued the story,
In little room confining mighty men,
Mangling by starts the full course of their glory.

Small time, but in that small most greatly lived
This star of England.

Small time, but in that small most greatly lived
This star of England. Fortune made his sword,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line Epilogue

Source Type:

Spoken by: