quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Reading Will » Figures of Speech » Characters » Cassius

Cassius

Julius Caesar

Brutus, I do observe you now of late

Read the Quote

Cassius
Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.
Brutus
Cassius,
Be not deceiv’d. If I have veil’d my look,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 37

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Read the Quote

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton & Simile

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
… continue reading this quote

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous

Read the Quote

Brutus
That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim.
How I have thought of this, and of these times,
I shall recount hereafter.Isocolon
For this present,
I would not (so with love I might entreat you)
Be any further mov’d. What you have said
I will consider;

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 171

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Well, Brutus, thou art noble

Read the Quote

Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet I see
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought
From that it is dispos’d; therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
For who so firm that cannot be seduc’d?Rhetorical Question and Ellipsis
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 320

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

You are dull, Casca

Read the Quote

You are dull, Casca; and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder,Polysyndeton

To see the strange impatience of the heavens;
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 60

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

I know where I will wear this dagger then

Read the Quote

I know where I will wear this dagger then;
Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.
Therein, ye gods, you make the weak most strong;
Therein, ye gods, you tyrants do defeat;Anaphora

Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,Polysyndeton

Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 92

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?

Read the Quote

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
Poor man, I know he would not be a wolf,
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep;
He were no lion, were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws.Metaphors
What trash is Rome?
What rubbish and what offal?

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 107

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

And let us swear our resolution

Read the Quote

Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

But what of Cicero? Shall we sound him?

Read the Quote

Cassius
But what of Cicero? Shall we sound him?
I think he will stand very strong with us.
Casca
Let us not leave him out.
Cinna
No, by no means.
Metellus Cimber
O, let us have him, for his silver hairsSynecdoche
Will purchase us a good opinion,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 152

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , , ,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar

Read the Quote

Metellus, kneeling
Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar,Anaphora
Metellus Cimber throws before thy seat
An humble heart.Synecdoche
Caesar
I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary menSynecdoche
And turn preordinance and first decree
Into the law of children.
… continue reading this quote