quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Characters » Berowne

Berowne

Love's Labors Lost

Come on, then, I will swear to study so

Read the Quote

Berowne
Come on, then, I will swear to study so,
To know the thing I am forbid to know:
As thus—to study where I well may dine,
When I to feast  expressly am forbid;
Or study where to meet some mistress fine
When mistresses from common sense are hid;
Or having sworn too hard-a-keeping oath,
Study to break it,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 61

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Berowne is like an envious sneaping frost

Read the Quote

King
Berowne is like an envious sneaping frost
That bites the firstborn infants of the spring.
Berowne
Well, say I am. Why should proud summer boast
Before the birds have any cause to sing?
Why should I joy in any abortive birth?
At Christmas I no more desire a rose
Than wish a snow in May’s new-fangled shows,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 74

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

We must of force dispense with this decree

Read the Quote

King
We must of force dispense with this decree.
She must lie here on mere necessity.
Berowne
Necessity will make us all forsworn
Three thousand times within this three years’ space;
For every man with his affects is born,
Not by might mastered, but by special grace.
If I break faith, this word shall speak for me:
I am forsworn on mere necessity.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 150

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

But is there no quick recreation granted?

Read the Quote

Berowne
But is there no quick recreation granted?
King
Ay, that there is. Our court, you know, is haunted
With a refinèd traveler of Spain,
A man in all the world’s new fashion planted,
That hath a mint of phrases in his brain;
One who the music of his own vain tongue
Doth ravish like enchanting harmony,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 165

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:

And I forsooth in love!

Read the Quote

And I forsooth in love! I that have been love’s whip,
A very beadle to a humorous sigh,
A critic, nay, a nightwatch constable,
A domineering pedant o’er the boy,
Than whom no mortal so magnificent.
This wimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy,
This Signior Junior, giant dwarf, Dan Cupid,
Regent of love rhymes, lord of folded arms,
Th’ anointed sovereign of sighs and groans,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 184

Source Type:

Spoken by:

I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move

Read the Quote

Longaville
I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move.
(reads)
O sweet Maria, empress of my love—
These numbers will I tear and write in prose.
(tears the paper)
Berowne, (aside)
O, rhymes are guards on wanton Cupid’s hose.
Disfigure not his shop!
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 53

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Sweet lords, sweet lovers, O, let us embrace

Read the Quote

Sweet lords, sweet lovers, O, let us embrace.
As true we are as flesh and blood can be.
The sea will ebb and flow, heaven show his face;
Young blood doth not obey an old decree.
We cannot cross the cause why we were born;
Therefore of all hands must we be forsworn.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 233

Source Type:

Spoken by:

What, did these rent lines show some love of thine? 

Read the Quote

King
What, did these rent lines show some love of thine?
Berowne
Did they, quoth you? Who sees the heavenly Rosaline
That, like a rude and savage man of Ind
At the first op’ning of the gorgeous East,
Bows not his vassal head and, strucken blind,
Kisses the base ground with obedient breast?
What peremptory eagle-sighted eye
Dares look upon the heaven of her brow
That is not blinded by her majesty?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 239

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Have at you, then, affection’s men-at-arms!

Read the Quote

Have at you, then, affection’s men-at-arms!
O, we have made a vow to study, lords,
And in that vow we have forsworn our books.
For when would you, my liege, or you, or you,
In leaden contemplation have found out
Such fiery numbers as the prompting eyes
Of beauty’s tutors have enriched you with?

From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 310

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

White-handed mistress, one sweet word with thee

Read the Quote

Berowne, to the Princess
White-handed mistress, one sweet word with thee.
Princess, speaking as Rosaline
Honey, and milk, and sugar—there is three.
Berowne
Nay then, two treys, an if you grow so nice,
Metheglin, wort, and malmsey. Well run, dice!
There’s half a dozen sweets.
Princess
Seventh sweet,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 246

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes: