quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Characters » Beatrice

Beatrice

Much Ado About Nothing

Appearance and Deception

Read the Note

A recurring theme in many of Shakespeare’s plays, and central to Much Ado About Nothing, explores how easily people are deceived not just by the false testimony of others but even by their own senses. Claudio, believing he was deceived by Don John, learned to place no trust in the words of others. With “Let every eye negotiate for itself,”
… continue reading this note

I have brought Count Claudio

Read the Quote

Beatrice
I have brought Count Claudio, whom you sent me to seek.
Prince
Why, how now, count, wherefore are you sad?
Claudio
Not sad, my lord.
Prince
How then, sick?

No, sure, my lord, my mother cried, but then there
was a star danced, and under that was I born.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 281

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Themes:

I do love nothing in the world so well as you

Read the Quote

Benedick
I do love nothing in the world so well as you—is not that strange?
Beatrice
As strange as the thing I know not. It were as possible for me to say I loved nothing so well as you, but believe me not, and yet I lie not; I confess nothing,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 281

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Kill Claudio!

Read the Quote

Beatrice
Kill Claudio!
Benedick
Ha! Not for the wide world.
Beatrice
You kill me to deny it. Farewell.
 She begins to exit.
Benedick
Tarry, sweet Beatrice.

O that I were a man for his sake! Or
that I had any friend would be a man for my sake!
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 303

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Appearance and Deception

There’s not one wise man among twenty that will praise himself

Read the Quote

There’s not one wise man among twenty that will praise himself.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Madam, you must come to your uncle

Read the Quote

Ursula
Madam, you must come to your uncle. Yonder’s
old coil at home. It is proved my Lady Hero
hath been falsely accused, the Prince and Claudio
mightily abused, and Don John is the author of all,
who is fled and gone. Will you come presently?
  Ursula exits.

I will live in thy heart,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 95

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,