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Antipholus of Syracuse

Comedy of Errors

Love and Water

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The Comedy of Error’s concluding dialogue between Dromio of Ephesus and Dromio of Syracuse neatly ties up an underlying theme of this farce, that true love — brotherly, marital or other — renders the lovers indistinguishable, “Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.” But this metaphor of the mirror at the end of the play is a shift from the similes of drops of water that recurred previously.
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He that commends me to mine own content

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He that commends me to mine own content,
Commends me to the thing I cannot get:
I to the world am like a drop of water,
That in the ocean seeks another drop,
Who, falling there to find his fellow forth
(Unseen, inquisitive), confounds himself.Simile

So I, to find a mother and a brother,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 33

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Love and Water

It is thyself, mine own self’s better part

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It is thyself, mine own self’s better part:
Mine eye’s clear eye, my dear heart’s dearer heart,Anaphora and Antanaclasis

My food, my fortune, and my sweet hope’s aim,
My sole earth’s heaven, and my heaven’s claim.Anaphora and Anadiplosis

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 66

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Love and Water

Marry, sir, by a rule as plain as the plain bald pate of Father Time

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Dromio of Syracuse
Marry, sir, by a rule as plain as the plain bald pate of Father Time himself.
Antipholus of Syracuse
Let’s hear it.
Dromio of Syracuse
There’s no time for a man to recover his hair that grows bald by nature.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 90

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